To Our Patients,

The health and well-being of our patients and our team members is our top priority. We recognize the level of concern and uncertainty surrounding COVID-19. Our office is closed for all non-essential dental treatment indefinitely.

If you have a dental emergency please call (204) 500-0119

Thank you for your trust and patience as we continue to work our way through this unusual and challenging time.

Aqua Dental Wellness

Read What We Are Doing To Ensure Your Safety

What we are doing to ensure your safety

We Are Open!

We’ve received the green light from our provincial government, public health officers, and national and provincial dental regulatory associations.

Committed to your health, safety, and well-being, we are taking measures to maintain physical distancing and a high level of sterilization to protect our patients and staff.

Infection control has always been a top priority for our practice, and you may have seen this during your visits to our office. Our infection control processes are made so that when you receive care, it’s both safe and comfortable.

Our office follows infection control recommendations made by the Alberta Dental Association and College (ADA&C), Health Canada and the Canadian Centre For Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS).

We want to tell you about the infection control procedures we follow in our practice to keep patients and staff safe.

You may see some changes when it is time for your next appointment. For example:

  • Our office will communicate with you beforehand to ask some screening questions. You’ll be asked those same questions again when you are in the office. We will not allow patients to enter our office who have symptoms or have traveled outside of Canada in the last 2 weeks.
  • We have hand sanitizer that we will ask you to use when you enter the office. You will also find some in the reception area and other places in the office for you to use as needed.
  • You may see that our waiting room will no longer offer magazines, children’s toys and so forth, since those items are difficult to clean and disinfect.
  • In the interest of physical distancing, we are advising all adult patients to attend the office alone to prevent crowding. 
  • Appointments will be managed to allow for social distancing between patients. That might mean that you’re offered fewer options for scheduling your appointment.
  • We use IsoVac, a mouth prop that blocks the back of the mouth and is a suction and picks up 90% of the aerosols. Click on the link if you would like to learn more.
  • We have Sharp Plasmacluster® Air purifiers. These high powered air filters use heppa filters to clean air in the office. 

We look forward to seeing you again and are happy to answer any questions you may have about the steps we take to keep you, and every patient, safe in our practice. To make an appointment, please call our office at (204) 663-3423 

Thank you for being our patient. We value your trust and loyalty and look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbours, and friends.

Sincerely,

The Aqua Dental Wellness Team 

Book an appointment today.

NEW PATIENT
(204) 500‑0119
EXISTING PATIENTS
(204) 663‑3423

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

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© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.

Another Important Reason to Visit Your Dentist

by: Dr. Tom Swanlund

We all know the importance of visiting your dentist on a regular basis to maintain your oral health and prevent disease, but did you know that your dentist is also screening your overall health when you visit as well?

Blood Pressure Screening

There may be times during your regular dental cleaning appointments your blood pressure and pulse are taken. Some people may wonder why a dental professional is concerned about this. It is vital to have a baseline blood pressure and pulse reading taken at the initial dental appointment and multiple times a year when a patient visits the dental office as this piece of information can give us an overall picture on the health of your cardiovascular system and whether routine dental care can be provided at that time.

Without this important piece of information, we really have no idea whether certain types of local anesthetics (freezing), laughing gas, sedation or even laying back in the dental chair are contraindicated. Blood pressure and pulse are simple, quick screening tools which allow dental professionals to assess overall health and refer to a medical professional if needed. It has been shown that hypertension (elevated) blood pressure when caught early and treated can help prevent damage to the heart, brain, kidneys and eyes. Typically a patient visits their dental office more often than their physician so it only makes sense that dental professionals screen a patient’s blood pressure and refer to other medical professionals accordingly.

Your oral care professional aims to prevent disease of the oral cavity and the rest of the body. Ask your dentist and dental hygienist to screen your blood pressure today!

Book an appointment today.

NEW PATIENT
(204) 500‑0119
EXISTING PATIENTS
(204) 663‑3423

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

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© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.

Is Teeth Whitening safe?

Many look at a bright smile as a standard of beauty. This idea can be largely attributed to models and personalities donning a white set of teeth. Teeth whitening has, thus, become a popular procedure for people of all ages.

While it’s no longer new as a form of cosmetic dentistry, you might be wondering whether it’s safe. 

Teeth Whitening Types

According to Health Canada, teeth whitening procedures before were mostly performed by professionals. However, today, various teeth whitening products have become easily accessible to consumers.

Teeth whitening systems can either be applied directly to the teeth or through trays or strips. The formulation and directions for use also vary.

In general, the higher the concentration of the whitening agent, called hydrogen peroxide, the more powerful and effective the treatment is. Note, though, that teeth brightening only works on natural teeth. It won’t work on crowns, fillings, and other dental work.

Teeth whitening is also not permanent. How long it lasts can be affected by a person’s lifestyle and eating habits. Aging is also another factor to consider.

Is Teeth Whitening Safe?

As for its health risks, clinical studies show that tooth whitening poses no harm or adverse effects as long as it’s used properly. After getting your teeth whitening, you may feel sensitivity but this shouldn’t last.

Advise your dentist if you’re already experiencing sensitivity even before getting your teeth whitened.

To minimize any risks when using teeth whitening products, be sure to follow directions for use. Health Canada also does not recommend the use of any teeth whitening product for over 14 days.

If you’re looking at using teeth whitening for a long period, the Canadian Dental Association says that the effects are yet to be identified and still needs further research.

To summarise, teeth whitening is safe provided it’s administered by an oral healthcare professional and the product is used by the consumer as directed. Start by consulting your case with a dentist in your area.

Teeth whitening may or may not be a suitable solution for your dental concerns. If it’s not, your dentist will be able to recommend alternatives that meet your aesthetic goals.

Many look at a bright smile as a standard of beauty. This idea can be largely attributed to models and personalities donning a white set of teeth. Teeth whitening has, thus, become a popular procedure for people of all ages.

While it’s no longer new as a form of cosmetic dentistry, you might be wondering whether it’s safe. 

Book an appointment today.

NEW PATIENT
(204) 500‑0119
EXISTING PATIENTS
(204) 663‑3423

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

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© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.

Why do I have bad breath?

Do you have bad breath?
by: Dr. Tom Swanlund

Bad breath otherwise known as halitosis can affect anyone at one time or another. In most circumstances it is a temporary condition and due to food or beverage that was consumed prior. In other situations bad breath becomes a chronic condition and can be due to a variety of factors such as; digestive problems, dry mouth due to medications and aging, poor oral hygiene, mouth breathing, a diet high refined carbohydrates, smoking, enlarged/infected tonsils/adenoids/sinuses and untreated oral infections.

With simple bad breath a few tips can help to keep your breath fresh between professional dental visits.

-Brushing 2-3x day -Brush the top of your mouth and tongue

-Floss 1x day -Replace your toothbrush every 2-3 months

-Use saliva-producing sugarless gum or candies

-Drink water or plain tea throughout the day

-See your dentist for professional cleaning a minimum of twice a year, regular visits are the best defense against bad breath

If bad breath continues after using these tips consistently, then further investigation may be warranted by both the dentist and physician.

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

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© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.

A Lifetime of Oral Health

by: Dr. Tom Swanlund

Most people understand that diet and exercise play a large part in keeping our bodies healthy. Besides diet and exercise practicing positive oral hygiene habits and keeping our mouths healthy go a long way in keeping our body healthy.

Deficient oral hygiene habits and poor oral can health can affect one’s quality of life. Infections within the mouth, pain and missing teeth can affect the way a person speaks, eats and talks. These oral health issues can negatively impact a person’s quality of life by affecting mental, physical and social well-bring.

Oral infection and disease, like any other condition in the body needs to be treated at the first signs to prevent progression and superinfection. Infections in the mouth can be acute or chronic. Typically acute infections produce marked symptoms such as pain, bleeding, exudate and swelling while chronic infections these symptoms may present they are less likely to do so. Chronic infections in the mouth may show symptoms such as mild bleeding, swelling and tenderness which may not be as alarming as an infection that shows up overnight. Both are equally as important to treat in a timely manner. A chronic infection is a serious problem that should not be ignored. Research in the last 10-20 years has proved the association between oral disease and other health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke and pre-term/low birth weight babies. Evidence from research also shows that oral infection and disease can aggravate other health conditions and keeping a healthy mouth is important part of a healthy body.

Follow these 5 tips to positive oral health!

1. See your dentist as recommended. Seeing your dentist every 6 months does not work for everyone, for some who have a chronic oral disease like periodontitis they may be coming every 3 months. Frequency of dental visits is dependent on the health of the oral cavity, follow your dentists’ recommendations to keep your mouth healthy!

2. Practice good oral hygiene at home! Brushing is important 2-3 day, but did you know that flossing is one of the most important things you can do for your oral health? Flossing cleans the area where sticky plaque laden with bacteria resides. This sticky bacteria laden plaque can cause cavities and gum disease. The goal is to floss your teeth 1x day.

3. Eat a healthy varied diet! The vitamins and minerals that come from healthy foods may help you fight oral diseases as well as keep you gums, bone and jawbone strong against bacteria.

4. Check your own mouth regularly. You can identify potential problems in your own mouth. Look for signs of gum disease such as red, shiny, puffy, sore or sensitive gums. Check for areas that bleed when you brush or floss or bad breath that won’t go away. While you are in your mouth look for signs of oral cancer which may show as sores that do not heal within 2 weeks, white/red patches, numbness or tingling, small lumps and thickening on the sides/bottom of the tongue, the floor or roof of your mouth the inside of the cheeks or the gums. If you identify any of these see your dentist as soon as possible for an oral examination.

5. Do not smoke or chew tobacco. Smoking and chewing tobacco are both dangerous to your oral health. Tobacco in general is a major cause of tooth loss through gum disease and may lead to oral cancer. Tobacco can increase your risk of heart disease and a variety of systemic cancers.

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

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© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.

8 Tips To Keep Your Mouth Healthy

by: Dr. Tom Swanlund

Follow these tips to keep your mouth healthy!

1. Brush at least 3x per day, preferably after breakfast, after lunch and after dinner. If you are unable to brush, drink water to naturally cleanse the food from your mouth. This can help prevent cavities.

2. A common side effect of many prescribed medication is dry mouth, otherwise known as xerostomia. This can put you at much higher risk of developing oral diseases such as cavities, gingivitis and periodontal disease. Stimulating saliva helps to cleanse the mouth, it can be achieved during the day through chewing sugarless gum, sucking on sour sugarless candies, or using a saliva substitute.

3. Eat healthy tooth-friendly snacks. Avoid snacking on starchy or sugar laden foods as these stick to the teeth and promote activity of harmful oral bacteria. Great snack ideas are fibrous ones like apples, pears, celery, as well as foods that coat the teeth and help prevent oral disease such as cheese and dark chocolate.

4. Beverage choices are just as important. Choose coffee or tea without milk or sugar. We always think sugar is the culprit for cavities but so is the milk we add to our warm beverages. Milk coats the teeth and is easily digestible by bacteria in the oral cavity, this raises the acidity level in the mouth and the teeth have a higher likelihood of breakdown (cavities). Watch acidic beverages as well such as pop, juice and sport drinks.

5. Give up smoking and chewing tobacco. Not only does this harmful habit increase your risk of oral and other types of cancer, it raises your risk of gum disease, oral fungus infections and cavities. If that is not bad enough it stains your teeth and causes halitosis (bad breath).

6. Limit alcohol. Heavy alcohol use can increase your risk of developing oral and throat cancers. If combined with tobacco use, your risk is raised substantially.

7. Make a habit of flossing. The surface area below the gum line that you cannot see is equal to the one above, cleaning it is vital to for your oral health. Actually the bacteria you brush off your teeth each time may not be as harmful as the bacteria that lurks under your gum line. Reason being, the bacteria that live under the gums are typically anaerobic ones, those that do not need oxygen to live and can produce by-products/toxins that can be detrimental to your gums and surrounding bone. Floss the teeth you want to keep!

8. See your dentist for a regular dental exam and your dental hygienist for regular dental cleanings to remove harmful bacteria, plaque and tarter.

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

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© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.

Cavities Are Caused by Bacteria

by: Dr. Tom Swanlund

Cavities, simply, are openings through the protective structure of the tooth/teeth caused by infectious bacteria. The protective outer surface of the tooth is enamel. At times, due to wear and disease, other areas of tooth structure may be exposed called dentin and cementum. Enamel is the hardest/strongest structure in the human body, even stronger than bones. Cementum and dentin on the other hand are softer and when exposed to the oral cavity can form soft areas or cavities at a much faster rate. Enamel, cementum and dentin all have a similar purpose; to protect the pulp of the tooth which is the area where the nerve and the rich blood vessels that feed the tooth reside.

Cavity formation can take some time. Initially, the rise in the acid level due to cavity-causing bacteria results in breakdown of the external portion of the tooth structure. This breakdown either continues with further degradation of the tooth structures or can be halted and reversed through application of fluoride and the buffering/remineralizaiton effect of saliva.

Increased acidity of the mouth occurs through consumption of carbohydrates, which when left on or around the teeth, is consumed by infectious bacteria which secrete their by-products (bacterial waste). The bacterial waste can raise the acidity level and increase the chance of cavities forming on the teeth. Good home care is important to rid the teeth of food so this process cannot begin.

Prevention of cavities starts with brushing three times a day for a minimum of two minutes with a fluoride toothpaste and flossing once a day. If a person is at high risk for cavities, a higher concentration of fluoride toothpaste or an added daily fluoride rinse is a good idea. As well, many medications which people take have a side effect such as dry mouth, which raises their chance of developing cavities, thus homecare is vital for prevention.

If your dentist has told you that you have a cavity, it is important you attend to it. In the early stages, a cavity stays within the enamel; but once it travels to the underlying dentin, it can spread rapidly. Once the cavity goes through the dentin and into the pulp, it can cause infection, inflammation and discomfort. When the pulp becomes inflamed and infected, many times it will require a root canal (removal of the pulp and nerve of the tooth). Catching a cavity in the early stages is the key.

In order to treat a cavity, the dentist will remove the soft area (cavity) of the tooth and replace it with a filling. The filling will take the space where the cavity was and protect the inner portions of the tooth, just as the enamel once did. It is important to keep the area around the filling as clean as possible to prevent new cavities from forming.

In some areas the water is not fluoridated so the use of fluoride toothpaste is vital in prevention of decay. According to the ODA, “Tooth decay is the most common chronic childhood disease, one of the leading causes of absences from school and only a small percentage know that it’s an infectious disease.” Prevention of oral disease goes a long way.
Brush, floss and rinse for oral health!

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

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© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.

Electric or Manual Toothbrush?

Electric or Manual Toothbrush?
by: Dr. Tom Swanlund

A recent poll on Sootoday.com showed that out of 1369 people who responded, 73% voted manual toothbrush over electric. This was not a scientific poll or study but it did show what the majority of the sootoday.com readers were using most.

We have come a long way with toothbrushes. Nowadays, walking down the aisle at Shopper’s Drug Mart or Walmart can make you dizzy with the variety of dental supplies available.
When it comes to toothbrushes, the main rule is soft-bristle brushes are best. Reason being soft-bristled toothbrushes will not harm the gum and will clean just as well as a hard-bristled toothbrush. Brushing technique and time using the toothbrush are two other important factors in acquiring a healthy and plaque-free mouth.

Manual brushes can be good, if used properly. Technique according to the individuals’ oral condition is important. If someone has gum recession, gum disease or other factors, modification of brush technique is key to maximizing plaque removal. It is also important to apply the correct pressure so as not to create damage on both the teeth and the gums. Your dental hygienist will review this to ensure you are using the brush properly.

Electric toothbrushes are divided into two types; battery- operated and rechargeable electric.
Battery operated toothbrushes are slightly more effective than manual when used properly. These brushes are not extremely powerful, but often the rotating action will help remove sticky plaque. These brushes have the downside of having a bulky brush head and often many children and adults start out with these but then switch to a rechargeable electric when they find the brush needs to be thrown away when the battery dies. These are a good start, but for optimal plaque/stain removal, improvement in gum health and long-term use, a rechargeable electric is the best choice.

Rechargeable electric toothbrushes are the ultimate choice in toothbrushes. Sonicare and Braun/Oral B are two that come to mind when recommending a brush to a patient. These brushes have been studied immensely over the years and demonstrate superior efficacy compared to manual or battery-operated toothbrushes. Plaque and stain removal is superior due to the oscillating/rotational action of the brush head during use. These brushes can be used in both children and adults as they make both small and large brush heads. The technique for these brushes is very simple, you let the brush do the work and you place it where you want to clean. No scrubbing, circles or sweeping is required. Once again, make sure your pressure is light! Anyone can benefit from a rechargeable electric toothbrush, just ask your oral healthcare professional what they recommend.

A healthy plaque-free mouth is the ultimate goal with tooth brushing so remember; 
1.Brush 2-3x per day for two minutes at a time.2.Soft-bristled brushes only!3.Use good technique taught to you by a dental hygienist.4.Use fluoridated toothpaste with your toothbrush.5.Gently brush your tongue after completing your teeth.

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

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© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.

What is Gingivitis?

Gingivitis is a common gum disease characterized by swelling and redness of the gingiva. Gingiva is the gum tissue surrounding the base of the teeth.

Gingivitis is caused by the body’s response to bacterial overgrowth in the mouth. Bacteria naturally exist in the mouth. Some are good and some are bad. The bad bacteria can spread with poor oral hygiene.

Other factors can trigger gingivitis but for bacteria-related cases, the problem is the plaque that sticks to the tooth. Plaque contains bacteria and food debris. When not removed, it irritates the gums and as a response, the body starts to fight the bacteria.

When you notice bleeding, tenderness, and redness in your gums, that’s a sign your body is attempting to beat down harmful bacteria. Don’t panic when you see blood when you brush. Gingivitis is reversible. And this shouldn’t keep you from brushing and flossing.

Some stop brushing and flossing thinking this could only cause the gums to bleed more. But when gingivitis starts, the more you need to start paying closer (and not less) attention to your dental care habits.

Risk Factors for Gingivitis

Aside from gingivitis, other possible reasons for bleeding gums include hormonal changes during pregnancy, menstrual or post-menopausal cycles. At these times, the mouth can become extra sensitive.

Those diagnosed with diabetes and other diseases are also more susceptible to gingivitis. Taking certain medications can also increase your risk of developing gum disease.

How to Treat and Prevent Gingivitis

  • Maintaining good oral hygiene habits is key.
  • Brush three times a day for at least two minutes at each time.
  • Floss daily as well to clean between teeth and below the gum-line.
  • Rinse with an antibacterial mouthwash.
  • Drink water more often, especially after meals.
  • See your dentist every six months.

Some are more prone to developing tartar. Talk to your dentist about this so you can be advised about the right frequency for your dental hygiene appointments. You may need to visit the dental office more often to get rid of plaque not removed by daily brushing and flossing and keep them from maturing.

Book an appointment today.

NEW PATIENT
(204) 500‑0119
EXISTING PATIENTS
(204) 663‑3423

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

Follow Us On

© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.

What is Dry Mouth?

Does your mouth feel dry when you wake up or even during the day?

Dry mouth can be uncomfortable and can also cause bad breath. But you don’t have to endure it for long. Your dental team can help you manage to treat it.

Dry mouth or xerostomia is caused by the lack of saliva in the mouth. Saliva is important as it helps neutralize acids in the mouth, control bacterial growth, and flush down food debris. Saliva also helps make eating and chewing enjoyable experiences.

Dry Mouth Causes

  • You may experience dry mouth as you age. This can be attributed to the changes in the body and medications you take, to name a few.
  • Certain medications, such as those for high blood pressure, can leave the mouth feeling dry.
  • Health conditions. Having illnesses such as eating disorders or a weakened immune system can also cause dry mouth.
  • Smoking. Smoking tobacco or cigarettes can also trigger dry mouth.
  • When there isn’t enough moisture in the mouth, dry mouth can occur.

Dry Mouth and Your Oral Health

When you have dry mouth, you become more vulnerable to tooth decay, gum disease, bad breath, and mouth ulcers. Saliva helps keep the mouth clean and also aids in food digestion.

How to Prevent Dry Mouth

  • Change medications. Talk to your physician or dentist about changing your prescriptions.
  • Use products to moisturize your mouth. Consider using products that restore and help maintain moisture in the mouth.
  • Swish with a fluoride rinse. Look out for the alcohol-free variants that are safe for daily use. Check the recommended products by the Canadian Dental Association.
  • Chew sugar-free gums. Increase salivary flow by chewing sugar-free gums and to also help keep the mouth clean.
  • Brush and floss daily. Brush three times a day to prevent plaque from building up. Floss to remove debris below the gum line.

The treatment for dry mouth depends on its cause. If you feel you have a dry mouth, talk to your doctors. The tips listed above may help relieve dry mouth, but they won’t resolve it for good.

Book an appointment today.

NEW PATIENT
(204) 500‑0119
EXISTING PATIENTS
(204) 663‑3423

Aqua Dental Wellness

New Patients: (204) 500‑0119

Existing Patients: (204) 663‑3423

Hours

Saturday by appointment only

Follow Us On

© 2020 Aqua Dental Wellness and Dental Growth Strategies https://dentalgrowthstrategies.com. All Rights Reserved.